The Treasure of a Sword

I forgot my Bible this morning. This Sunday morning. This Sunday morning when I attended church. This Sunday morning when I attended church and where we always read our Bibles. This Sunday morning when I attended church and where we always read our Bibles, and where the pastor’s wife is expected to set a good example! Awful thing. Actually, I recalled the forgotten item when we were out on Hwy 95 before we arrived at the store to pick up cinnamon rolls, but I didn’t want to ask Jerry to go back to get it. “There are extra Bibles at the church,” I reasoned with myself. “I’ll use one of those.”

We left our house at 7:30, and I had lots of things to take to church. At 8:00 was to be our first “new converts” class, and I brewed a pot of coffee to take, along with a basket full of cups, sweeteners, napkins, spoons, forks and the like. I also carried out the new keyboard, my camera case, my purse, and my bag that contains miscellaneous items for Christ Alive. (Recall that we share meeting space with Tiger Trenching, so we take a fair amount of things back and forth, although we do leave speakers, easels, signs and things like that.) Anyway, in the hustle of getting all that stuff to the car, I forgot my Bible. I had thought of it earlier, remembering that I put the Bible in my computer case last night when I was doing some writing, but the moment slipped by, and my Bible was left at home.

Since I was a child, I’ve heard pastors tell how important the Bible is, how much we should treasure its words, how diligently we should study its concepts. “The Bible is your sword,” I’ve been told. “To not have your Bible is as a soldier going to battle without his weapon.”

So in the service today, I held a strange Bible, and although the words read exactly the same, I missed my own copy. The new one felt stiff and unfamiliar in my hands. Then too, I wasn’t free to make marks in it as I am prone to do with my own. When we arrived back at the motor home after lunch, before I came over to the rec hall, I zipped open a compartment of my computer case just to be sure. Yes! There it was. My own Bible, my sword, my treasure.

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About Shirley Buxton

Still full of life and ready to be on the move, Shirley at 78 years old feels blessed to have lots of energy and to be full of optimism. She has been married to Jerry for 60 years. They have 4 children, 12 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren...all beautiful and highly intelligent--of course. :)
This entry was posted in Bible, Christian Service, Christianity, Church, Devotionals, God. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to The Treasure of a Sword

  1. cathiesblogg says:

    I know exactly how you feel..My Bible is so special to me..and I also can’t see as good as I use, to so my Rainbow Bible is wonderful for me..

  2. Shirley says:

    Hello, Cathie. Yes, God’s Holy Word should be precious and wonderful to all of us. Within its covers, if we study carefully, is the roadmap to Heaven. May we arrive there safely!

  3. inhisgrace says:

    you do make me think again about treasuring the Bibles that I own. thank you. have a blessed week!

  4. Shirley says:

    Good morning, Inhis grace. When I was a child, I was admonished never to physically place anything atop a Bible…don’t put another book on it, a magazine, etc. I’m not sure if that’s necessary or not, for it is not the physical book that is so precious, I suppose, but what it represents–the Word of God. Yet, I still continue to regard carefully, my physical Bible. I do mark it up, though, and stick papers and notes in mine.

  5. Pingback: The Bible is your sword « living in his grace

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